Women's Wear Daily

WWD Report Card: Oh, the Drama!

That’s showbiz baby! The best and worst of this year’s Tony Awards. Billy Porter: B Billy Porter  Erik Pendzich/Shutterstock Porter has turned the red carpet into a social and political platform — and we are all for it. But this red and pink tulle dress feels a little contrived; maybe it needs some jazz hands. Judith Light: A- Judith Light  Evan Agostini/Invision/AP/Shutterstock The Broadway veteran looks beautiful in this silver beaded number with pink velvet detailing. The form-fitting silhouette is sleek, elegant and definitely modern. Matt Bomer: A Matt Bomer with his son, Henry Halls.  Erik Pendzich/Shutterstock The tonal midnight blue tuxedo is an elegant classic and fits him like a glove. The sharp sartorial gene must run in the family: his son is as chic as his dad. Cynthia Erivo: B- Cynthia Erivo  Gregory Pace/Shutterstock When it comes to muppet hair, less is more. This sexy bride meets Big Bird is not ideal. A little less feather would go a long way. James Corden: D James Corden with his wife, Julia Carey  Gregory Pace/Shutterstock Funny comedians tend to get away with fashion murder at times, but not here. This walking renaissance floral print wallpaper would be more suited for uptown lady’s guest half bathroom than a red carpet suit. Darren Criss: B Darren Criss  Stephen Lovekin/Shutterstock In this case, B is for boring.

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Is Digital Human?

Markus Strobel, president of global skin and personal care at Procter & Gamble, encountered an out-of-the-blue question from a Millennial brand manager during a meeting one day. “Is digital human?” he asked. Strobel explained: “I said, ‘What do you mean?’ He said, ‘Is this just about metrics and numbers and percentages, or is digital human?’ And that question stuck with me — it grabbed and never let me go.” The executive believes that when one discovers a brand’s humanity, it can transform connections to consumers and the business’ results. To get to the brand’s humanity, a person must look at mankind’s ancestors and evolutionary biology. “There’s very credible research that humans judge other humans basically on just two questions: What are your intentions toward me? And what is your ability to deliver on these intentions? “Those two concepts have also been described as warmth and competence. There is a hypothesis out there that this is not only how humans judge other humans, this is also how humans judge brands,” he continued. “The theory is you have to have both…to succeed in today’s marketplace.” When P&G’s SK-II, from Japan, was struggling with flat sales, a lack of new user growth and an aging user base, Strobel

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Algenist and Ingredient-Level Innovation

“Algenist is a skin-care brand that really drives ingredient-level innovation through biotechnology, primarily with algae science,” explained Rose Fernandez, chief executive officer of the company, whose patented ingredient is alguronic acid. “That alguronic acid was born from an unexpected discovery.” In San Francisco, scientists were making biofuel from algae and came across a particular strain for which they had no use. Marketer Frederic Stoeckel was then brought in, and he sprung to life the vision of Algenist. The acid from micro algae, said Fernandez, provides cell renewal and regeneration. “That’s how we get our 10-day claims,” she explained. The press embraced Algenist. “People were really starting to understand what you could do with the powers of algae,” she said. Fernandez met Stoeckel, and they had an immediate connection, since both are passionate about the beauty business and inspired by biotechnology. She began at Algenist as senior vice president of sales, working alongside him. Once Algenist was taken over by Tengram Capital Partners, it was carved off of the biotech laboratory in which it had been born. “We had to stand up as a biotech brand, and we were already operating, trading with retailers for years already,” Fernandez said. “That’s an insane process — it’s like basically

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